News in brief

UEA accidentally sent a spreadsheet with confidential medical information to 320 undergrads. The sheet wasn’t password protected, or encrypted, because... the confidential medical information was stored in a spreadsheet because… the spreadsheet was accessible to be attached to an email because… Please tell me that the GDPR will prompt UK orgs to spend at least … Continue reading News in brief

At least make a token effort

I was talking to someone about data security yesterday afternoon, and mentioned the Mexican data breach where 93.4m citizen records were left in an unsecured cloud database – and immediately stolen – as an example of the carelessness people seem to experience when taking advantage of cheap web storage and processing. Pretty much while I … Continue reading At least make a token effort

Kafka strikes again: GDPR requires consent, but you can’t ask for it

I’ve let this one fester for a while – partly because I’ve been angry about other things, and partly because you must be bored with my ranting about the GDPR by now. But I really can’t let this one pass. A key principle – perhaps the key principle – of the GDPR is the requirement … Continue reading Kafka strikes again: GDPR requires consent, but you can’t ask for it

Amber Rudd read History, but didn’t understand it

Those who do not understand history are doomed to repeat it[1]. And here I am, watching it repeat. This is my third post on this topic. Sorry. But it's important. Amber Rudd, the UK Home Secretary, suggested on Sunday that end-to-end encryption is “unacceptable”. She trotted out the usual excuses about terrorism and the need … Continue reading Amber Rudd read History, but didn’t understand it